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On September 23, FATj's Corey Wagner, was joined by Conversion Interactive Agency's Priscilla Peters for a webinar on how to reduce unqualified leads in today's new driver market. Our teams received tremendous feedback from our attendees, and we wanted consolidate some of the highlights from the webinar in one place. In this post, you will be able to read through the Q&A portion of the webinar, where we received some great questions from our audience. In case you want to watch the webinar in full, you can register to view it here.

If you have any additional questions for Corey or Priscilla, reach out to us at hello@fatj.com to get the answers you need.

Question 1: What is the reason for driver turnover right now?

Priscilla

As we talked about earlier, there are reasons related to COVID for turnover. But if you think about the fact that turnover was low for a while, for about a 5-6 month period. Then whenever freight booms, typically that’s when turnover starts to rise again. It’s always been that way since I’ve been in this industry. Drivers begin to think “oh the grass is greener on the other side” and we start to have those types of conversations. 

But typically, when freight is good, turnover is high. I think we are seeing that, and I do think that the whole component of drivers leaving the industry is probably making it feel like the pinch is a little worse than it traditionally is from a turnover perspective. So from all of those reasons we talked about earlier, not just retirements and the normal reasons, but because people are staying home with their kids and new factors have come into play with the pandemic. 

 

I really think those are the top reasons. But if you are looking at simple high-level reasons, the freight being better is typically why turnover is high.

Question 2: Indeed always mentions to keep job titles short and sweet, what are your thoughts?

Corey

That’s a good question and a lot to unpack. For one, you should try to have that conversation with each platform you use because each one operates differently. So if Indeed makes that suggestion, maybe push back at them and ask, “why?” And so, Indeed is one of those platforms that will give you organic traffic, so if you are using shorter titles and you do get irrelevant clicks, you are not actually paying for them so there’s that potential issue you are avoiding. 

But with organic placements with high click-through rates, if the candidate sees the job description and they don’t apply, the platform will realize that this isn’t relevant or it isn’t a great job description and they are going to stop giving it organic traffic. 

From the paid side, it depends on what you mean by “short”. If it’s, “Truck Driver”, then of course that’s not going to be enough. But again, having a conversation with each platform to see what works best for them is worth having. And at the end, if you’re not sure after the conversation, it doesn’t hurt to A/B test these titles. Hardly any platform is charging you per job posting, so try a long title of your own and try a short one that the vendor recommended, and let it run for a few weeks to see what happens.

For job descriptions with keywords that are pulled to gain more impressions, some platforms do that and some don’t necessarily look that deep into your description. Anywhere that FATj syndicates, we always send the whole content of your job so that way if they can index that way based on your description, they will. But not all platforms are as sophisticated at that and there could be a loss. With the job title, maybe one of ten words in there will be a keyword, and if you just rely on that one keyword being in your description, where you probably have 300 words, it may get lost in the shuffle and not index properly.

Question 3: Do you recommend A/B testing titles or descriptions?

Corey

Yes, like I just covered. It doesn’t really cost anything extra to do A/B testing, but just remember that every time you do it you’re cutting your data in half so you can only put your budget behind so many jobs and different tests. And you need to have a decent sample size to determine whether this A actually beat the B. So make sure it’s something that has the potential. 

For example, changing exclamation points to a period is going to be negligible, and will waste your time and budget to try to get impressions for both of those scenarios to see which is better. Definitely testing, almost anything else in the title would make sense.

Question 4: How does a carrier identify quality? A qualified and quality driver?

Priscilla

I think one of the things we always challenge carriers to do is identify who is their ideal driver. What does your ideal driver look like? Where do they live? What are their habits and the way they run? 

Identifying down to character traits, because what you will begin to see is that drivers that stay with your organization who are “quality drivers” for you and your carrier, may not exactly look like other carriers. Like, if you a lot of drop and hook, then you are looking for someone that is good with that. Or if you have lots of regional runs, then you need someone who is interested in that. So I would ask your team or sit down with a group of folks at your carrier and identify what we call a driver persona, and figure out what it means to you. Because that’s what quality really means to you.

Yes, we all need a driver with a CDL and a good record and all those things, but really what do they look like? That’s a good exercise to answer your questions so you know, yes it’s a qualified driver, but are they really qualified for us? Does it make sense for us to hire this guy or girl?

Question 5: What are your tips for advertising on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter?

Corey

So obviously we could have a whole other webinar just on social media advertising. It’s a key component that we use to generate leads as well. A lot of the same principles go hand in hand, including being extremely transparent about job descriptions. Making sure benefits are in there, and knowing you only have so much room to work with. You have a little bit more than a title, but a lot less than a description. So just make sure that in the first three lines you are highlighting the key benefits, because otherwise the user will have to click “See More” and most people aren’t doing that. Most people are just flying through and saying “Woah is that a good position or not?” 

And on social media, it’s all passive. Most job advertising that gets done is to active candidates who are willing to look through a job description to see if it meets their needs. On social media, they’re looking at all sorts of content and probably weren’t planning on applying to a job today so it has to be pretty compelling stuff. You can’t say, “Great benefits and great pay,” because that’s not going to get someone out of their newsfeed and ready to apply with you. The other big difference is that images matter a whole lot on social media, where they don’t on a job description on a job board. 

That’s probably the most important thing to A/B test on social media, trying different images. Make sure that the freight on the image extends to the audience you are targeting and the job you are advertising, but there’s a lot more we could always talk about there.

Priscilla

I’d also like to add in to make sure you always monitor your ads. I can’t tell you how many times we’ve seen carriers invest thousands of dollars in their social ads, and then they don’t invest in the monitoring. Either your people monitoring those ads or your agency, whoever you partner with, should be monitoring those. Those candidates are on social media and having conversations, so if they see an ad and have a question, they’re just going to comment on that ad.

And if you’re not monitoring it, it’s like a phone call that you just never answered. So be sure that you are monitoring your ads on social media.

Question 6: Special characters like colons, semi-colons, exclamation points, dollar signs, etc. in job titles; do platforms look down on that? Especially in Google Search?

Corey

Well I know with Google paid search, they won’t even let you use exclamation points or a lot of special characters so when you go to write the add, it will just delete it for you. They won’t even let you do it, and other things like all caps. They obviously do frown down upon that.

A general rule of thumb is to keep the special characters to a minimum. But of course, a lot of companies have an ampersand in their name, so they need to use it. We use dashes to separate benefits in our titles all the time and have not run into any issues. So again, really you want to talk to every platform and ask them how it works on their end and where they syndicate. But in general, keep it limited with special characters because it won’t help much.


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If you missed the webinar, you can view it on-demand here. We loved hosting this event, and having friends in the transportation community join us for it, and we are looking forward to inviting you to our next one.

Connor Zazzo

Written by Connor Zazzo

Connor is the Marketing Manager for FATj.com, focused on providing valuable insights to help drive forward the hiring efforts of recruitment teams across the country. Interested in reaching out to Connor to learn more about FATj.com? Connect with him on LinkedIn!